Monday, May 25, 2020

Analysis Of Jack Kerouacs On The Road - 1694 Words

Author and Beat literary movement pioneer Jack Kerouac adopts what he calls â€Å"spontaneous prose† as his own unique style in On the Road. Otherwise known as â€Å"stream of consciousness,† this is a method of writing that essentially captures the nebulous and unrelated thoughts that cross the narrator’s mind at any given moment, without break for explanation. Critics are quick to point out that this concept is materialized in the premise of Kerouac’s novel On the Road itself, citing the cross-country trek that is the center around which the novel revolves. It is one of confusion, calamity, and carelessness, as well as fast-paced, unpredictable change of direction and complete emancipation of personal responsibility that is the self-proclaimed†¦show more content†¦Neal’s attitude towards society is one more of individuality rather than rebellion. As one critic puts it, â€Å"[Neal] doesn’t want to overthrow the government, but he doesn’t want a government, or anyone else for that matter, to have control over him† (Napierkowski and Stanley 188). He begins to idolize Neal and his viral, vivid personality. One critic describes the pair’s relationship as one of â€Å"lost brother[s],† and goes on to describe Neal as the like-minded, vibrant wanderer that Kerouac desired (Cunnel 8). Kerouac even grows jealous when Neal meets Allen Ginsberg, where he writes, â€Å"Two keen minds that [Allen and Neal] are they took to each other at the drop of a hat†¦ the holy con-man the great sorrowful poetic con-man that is Allen Ginsberg. From that moment on I saw very little of Neal and I was a little sorry too†¦ Their energies met head-on. I was a lout compared; I couldn’t keep up with them† (Kerouac 112). Kerouac’s feelings of inadequacy in terms of the explosive personalities of the two survive through his strong affinity towards Neal. While in Denver, Neal and Allen try to â€Å"soul-connect,† the two of them both having taken Benzedrine and babbling complete nonsense to each other straight through the night. The pair realize â€Å"‘[Kerouac’s] been awake all this time listening,’† andShow MoreRelatedAnalysis Of Jack Kerouacs On The Road1420 Words   |  6 Pages Part One of Jack Kerouac’s On the Road opens with the introduction of main characters, Sal Paradise, who had recently separated from his first wife, to Dean Moriarty. Although Sal had long been interested in Dean, it is Dean who comes to Sal, asking him to teach him how to write. Dean’s wife, Marylou returns to Denver, leaving him to bond with Sal over writing, music, and plans to travel west, where Dean is from and Sal has always wanted to go. Although Dean heads west on his own, Sal soon findsRead More Twain’s Huckleberry Finn and Kerouac’s On the Road – The River and the Road3035 Words   |  13 PagesTwain’s Huckleberry Finn and Kerouac’s On the Road – The River and the Road One element that separates a good novel from a great novel is its enduring effects on society. A great novel transcends time; it changes and mirrors the consciousness of a civilization. One such novel is Mark Twain’s Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. For the past one hundred and fifteen years, it has remained in print and has been one of the most widely studied texts in high schools and colleges. According to Lionel TrillingRead MoreRomanticism and Modernism as Strange Bedfellows: A Fresh Look at Jack Kerouacs On the Road12240 Words   |  49 Pagesï » ¿ Romanticism and Modernism as Strange Bedfellows: A Fresh Look of Jack Kerouac’s On the Road Bliss was it in that dawn to be alive, But to be young was very Heaven! O time In which the meagre, stale, forbidding ways Of custom, law and statute, took at once The attraction of a Country in Romance! The Prelude—William Wordsworth (Come in under the shadow of this rock), And I will show you something different from either Your shadow at morning striding behind you Or your shadow at eveningRead MoreShort Analyses of Some of the Best American Literature872 Words   |  4 Pagesï » ¿American Literature in Context Introduction The following analysis of these works of literature will focus on to what extents these works are representative of the time in which they were write. This refers to the social as well as the artistic or aesthetic context in which they were written. The paper will attempt to show how these works reflect the age and concerns in which they were written. 1. Charlotte Perkins Gilman: The Yellow Wallpaper. This story which was first published in 1892Read MoreEssay on Jack Kerouacs On the Road and Allen Ginsbergs Howl3843 Words   |  16 PagesJack Kerouacs On the Road and Allen Ginsbergs Howl Works Cited It was a 1951 TIME cover story, which dubbed the Beats a ‘Silent Generation, ’ that led to Allen Ginsberg’s retort in his poem ‘America,’ in which he vocalises a frustration at this loss of self- importance. The fifties Beat Generation, notably through Jack Kerouac’s On the Road and Allen Ginsberg’s Howl#61482; as will here be discussed, fought to revitalise individuality and revolutionise their censored society which seemed toRead MoreA Critical Analysis Of Lessons From The Assembly Line985 Words   |  4 PagesFinally, the article challenges people in more advantaged positions – in this case, starry-eyed college students – to see worth in experiences outside of their bubble as they can be valuable as well. Braaksmas claims are correct, and the critical analysis will support his assertions. Nevertheless, Braaksma’s central argument is eclipsed by his personal narrative as it overshadows broader social issues making certain elements of his piece hard to discern. The key points that underline Braaksmas goalRead More Jack Kerouacs On the Road Essay3102 Words   |  13 PagesJack Kerouacs On the Road Works Cited Not Included   Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Jack Kerouac is the first to explore the world of the wandering hoboes in his novel, On the Road. He created a world that shows the lives and motivations of this culture he himself named the Beats. Kerouac saw the beats as people who rebel against everything accepted to gain freedom and expression. Although he has been highly criticized for his lack of writing skills, he made a novel that is both realistic and enjoyable to read. He hasRead MoreWarby Parker1381 Words   |  6 Pagesbetter place. Their method is quite unique. You may wonder where the name â€Å"Warby Parker† originated. Inspired by Jack Kerouac, the founders took the name of two of Mr. Kerouac’s earliest characters discovered in his recently discovered personal journals. One character was named Zagg Parker and one Warby Pepper, hence Warby Parker. â€Å"Kerouac inspired a generation to take a road less traveled and to see the world through a different lens.† (Warby Parker) In a thesis written by Dirk Brauner ofRead MoreThe Concept of Vulnerability in Memoirs of a Beatnik and On the Road3326 Words   |  14 PagesThe Beat Generation: Vulnerable Victims or Inviolable Individuals? The Concept of Vulnerability in Memoirs of a Beatnik and On the Road Vulnerability is often one-dimensionally viewed as the degree to which mishaps, pain and shame are allowed to enter into one’s life. However it is also the birthplace of creativity and basis for a feeling of self-worthiness. Thereby vulnerability creates authenticity. There are various different definitions of vulnerability according to the field in whichRead MoreAnalysis Of Sonny s Blues By John M. Lee2198 Words   |  9 PagesBeydoun Instructor: Dr. Kim Course: English 132 Sonny’s Blues is one of the famous stories expressing the deplorable conditions the Black community found themselves in during the struggle against racial segregation in the American history. The analysis given by John M. Reilley is to draw the attention of the readers and audience on the image of the black community, basically as expressed by Sonny’s Blues as a metaphor. Following the publication of Sonny’s Blues, James Baldwin realized he had a

Thursday, May 14, 2020

Apartheid Education - the South African Example Free Essay Example, 2250 words

Apartheid served specific interests; the racial characteristics of people was just a reason for the development of inequalities among the population; in fact, the need for the promotion of the rights of a specific class, the rich people, was the most important reason for the appearance and the development of Apartheid. In the study of Vale (2008), it is noted that under the apartheid system three separate traditions English-speaking, Afrikaner, and Homeland co-existed, albeit uneasily, in separate institutional forms (Vale, 2008, 117). In other words, Apartheid supporters made the necessary adjustments to the system s schemes so that it could be easily adopted by the local communities. The development of Apartheid was supported by the media and the press of that period a tool that helped towards the quick expansion of the specific system around the world - especially across Africa. In this context, it is noted that under apartheid, the mainstream Afrikaans media served as vehicles for the ideology of apartheid; since democratization, they have attempted to rid themselves of this ideological baggage, and instead embraced a free-market ideology in which race has ostensibly disappeared (Wasserman, 2009, 61). We will write a custom essay sample on Apartheid Education - the South African Example or any topic specifically for you Only $17.96 $11.86/page Through the above system, it is made clear that Apartheid has been a system served not the need for the creation of a superior social class but the need for supporting the financial needs of the specific class.

Wednesday, May 6, 2020

A Social Worker At My Sister s House - 970 Words

Social worker is a challenging but yet a rewarding profession. You have to be an active listener, compassionate, supportive, non-judgmental, and an empathetic person to be a great social worker. This week our assignment was to interview a social worker. On 09/17/2015, I had the pleasure to interview a social worker at My Sister’s House in Nashville, NC. I chose My Sister’s House because I use to volunteer there in 2011-2012 as crisis call taker. I like the services they provide for the community. My Sister’s House is a non-profit organization that helps domestic and sexual abuse victims with housing, emotional and legal resources. The building is an office space between other businesses like a plaza. It is across from Nash County Court House in Nashville, NC. Once you entered the office, it is like a shot gun house. You have the receptionist area and once pass that area, you have offices on each side of the hall. It is quite small hence they are moving into a n ew building in Rocky Mount on January 2016. It does not give a warm feeling at all but I think the employees make the victims feel comfortable. The social worker I interviewed has been employed there since 2012 as a court advocate/social worker. However, she started out as a volunteer a crisis call taker. Her name is Telisa Richardson. Before we got started with the interview, I asked her where did she received her educational credentials. Ms. Richardson told me that she is an alumna of Barton College with a BSW inShow MoreRelatedA Social Worker At My Sister s House Essay976 Words   |  4 PagesA social worker is a challenging but yet a rewarding profession. You have to be an active listener, compassionate, supportive, non-judgmental, and an empathetic person to be a great social worker. This week our assignment was to interview a social worker. On 09/17/2015, I had the pleasure to interview a social worker at My Sister’s House in Nashville, NC. I chose My Sister’s House because I use to volunteer there in 2011-2012 as a crisis call taker. I like the services they provide for the communityRead MoreSocial Workers Help Clients Cope With Problems1489 Words   |  6 Pagesocial Worker Social workers help clients cope with problems such as poverty, abuse, addiction, and mental illness by providing counseling, connecting clients with service providers, and encouraging clients to meet their own needs. Although it will be a tough job, I m up for a challenge. I want to help children, to live a long happy life. I want to pursue a career in Social Working. Looking over my past, and children I have worked with I want to help make everyone s lives better than before. WhatRead MorePersonal Narrative : My Life And Personality1399 Words   |  6 Pagesmany jokes, even a bullying tool, but most importantly it is the perfect name for me, because its meaning is true to my life and personality. Princess was the name given to me by my aunt who felt in her words â€Å"your parents were crazy wanting to name you WhyJahBull and all that. I said the child’s name is Princess and that’s what I’m going to call her†. Ja’Nai is the name given by my mother. She got it from the bible, it means God answers. A few years ago, she told me she had been pronouncing itRead MoreAn Internship Was A Great Experience1062 Words   |  5 PagesMy process in an internship was a great experience. I was working with Comunidades Unidas (Communities United) during these four months. My experience with this non-profit organization is incredible and at the same time I learned to work with members of the community. This organization works with undeserved Latino Community in the West side of Salt Lake City. I did not work an only specific area because they work in different files. However, I was a case manager who received call and tries to referRead MoreWhat Does Soc iology Mean?1585 Words   |  7 Pagesabout some concept and topic such as inequality (social class, social mobility, gender, race and ethnicity), work, economy, marriage, and family. Inequality In my country Saudi Arabia, there is inequality, and it is affected peoples lives. I used to work for Saudi Airlines for five years. In that period, I experienced inequality such as promotions, and training opportunity. That inequality made me angry, and forced me to quit working. My social class is the upper-middle class. I am a 29-year-oldRead MoreThe Teenage Mother Case Study1621 Words   |  7 Pageswith Casey, her six-year-old daughter. Hailey has been referred to social services cell for appropriate social work intervention. She has been engaging in bouts of anger issues and has a history of suffering from binge eating weight loss. Case Overview and Analysis Hailey s mother left her father and her two sisters when they were very young children because of problems she had confronting her alcohol addiction. Hailey and her sisters were then sent to a home for children, where they resided for manyRead MoreAnalysis Of Do I Know You By Bette Ann Maskowitz1111 Words   |  5 Pagesdescribe the ageing process; which starts at birth and does not end until death. In the memoir â€Å"Do I Know You† by Bette Ann Maskowitz, creates an unforgettable portrait of an ordinary woman at the end of her life. A touching account of the author`s and her sister`s attempt to aid and assist their mother as she grows older and must cope with her declining health. The memoir went exactly how I thought it would be. Bette Ann Markowitz’s situation of taking care of a parent who has Alzheimer is very common;Read MoreThe Importance Of Social Work1507 Words   |  7 PagesSocial workers should be helping others without being judgmental and cultural biases in order to conduct effective and ethical practice. In social work practice, understanding diversity and individual differences are the very important tools to be closely connected to people in need. As a matter of fact, social work strongly emphasizes cultural competence due to the delivery of services to people with different cultures. Cultural competence allows social workers to increase the ability to understandRead MoreMy Step Brother For 1 : I Don t Know Where We re Going1761 Words   |  8 Pages At times like this I envy my younger step-brother for 1) Being able to have my step-father as his biological father 2) To have a childhood 3) To view the world in innocence and 4) To not understand half of what is going on around him. I looked at my sister as we sat together in the back of the car, she looked back at me and gave me a â€Å"Why?† look and I responded back with the â€Å"I don’t know where we’re going.† face. We went back and forth talking back and forth with our facial expression and it bothRead MoreA Woman s Mother And One Brother Are Deceased1538 Words   |  7 Pagesliving provider, Melissa and her family. She is currently unemployed. JG has three biological brothers and two sisters alive. Her mom and one brother are deceased. She communicates frequently with one of her sisters in person and by phone. She is very concerned about one of her brothers who abuse substances. He is homeless and JG has engaged in frequent attempts to sneak out of the house at 4:00 am to search for him. Her efforts have been unsuccessful however, and her caregiver and family are very

Tuesday, May 5, 2020

Voting Ban On Prisoners

Question: Discuss about the Article for Voting Ban On Prisoners? Answer: The Government has the scope or rather the opportunity through the constitutional reform program, to given end to the outdated punishment of the civic death which dated back to the Forfeiture Act 1870. This in turn will bring the United Kingdom into line with a huge majority of the countries in the European Council and facilitate a modern or a different type of prison system to stress on the civic rehabilitation and responsibility but not the social elimination[1]. There were no central problems in enabling the victims for voting[2]. Therefore, there was a rule set out by the Electoral Commission to make such a mechanism through which the prisoner will be enabled to cast their vote. So the government instead of dealing with the compensation claims and other matters should give a ban on this uncivilized and outdated system of not allowing the prisoners to vote[3]. However, it is important to discuss how appropriate and valid is the governments decision to ban the voting rights of pris oners. In the case of Stockale v. Hansard, the Parliament of the United Kingdom challenged the privilege of parliament that became unsuccessful thus, leading to legislative reform[4]. The Court in this case concluded that the Commons was a court superior to any court of law and both the Houses of Parliament have the authority to make or unmake laws and that no resolution can be passed to decide the nature of privilege. In short, it meant that Each House (Commons andLords) was the sole judge of its own privileges. The judgment in the said case also concluded that aresolution of the House declaratory of its own privileges could not be questioned in any court of law. Similarly, in the case of King v. Lake[5], the plaintiff and the defendant were working on removing the automobile transmission where it suddenly fell off and fractured the left arm of the plaintiff. The Supreme Court was of the view that they have an approval for the instruction which was mandatory in anticipating the future chan ges in instructions on this subject. In the case of Gridley v. Johnson[6], the Supreme Court stated that the rule of similar localities has outlived many usefulness and the rule has changed the substantive law of the State in this respect. The trial court and the attorneys of the state continue to use the deletion of the word and they agree with the contention of the defendant. In the case of Smile v. Lawson[7], the trial Court was of the opinion that, having given an approved instruction the use of which at the time was mandatory may not be convicted of error in not anticipating future changes in instructions on this subject. In the case of Scoppola v. Italy[8] makes a clear view of the fact that the sentenced prisoners of United States have the right to cast their votes. It points out the principles set out in the judgment of Hirst (no2) that the people who were sentenced to any term, it may be years, months or anything and also the situation, is not well-matched with Article 3 of the Protocol No 1 of the European Conventions on Human Rights. The margin of appreciation or the margin of state discretion is a doctrine with a wide scope in international human rights law. It was developed by the European Court of Human Rights, to judge whether a state party to the European Convention on Human Rights should be sanctioned for derogations. In the general view, people in the prison are moved to drop their right to independence, not their personality. The UKs old-fashioned objection on the sentenced prisoners contains no pace in the modern democracy and is morally and legally unsustainable. The official and the experienced governors of prison, present and past bishops to the prisons, electoral commissions, chief inspectors, legal experts and the other European Governments believes that the prisoners should be able to implement their civic responsibilities. As a result, the European Court had made a clear judgment about the legal obligations of UK and to overturn the ban on this system. The UK's objection on the ban on prisoners voting rights remains constant in March 2004 even it was unlawful. The law is a leftover or the remains of the 19th century which stay back Forfeiture Act of 1870 which was according to the concept of the Civic death, a punishment based on the removal of the rights of the citizens. Since the past eight years, when the ban on the giving of votes was stated unlawful, the government of UK has frequently detailing the implementation of the opinion of the European Court. Depending upon the ruling of the European Court in 2004, the case of Hirst (2), in 2005 the verdict of the Grand Chamber, that the current objection of the UKs on allowing all the prisoners from selection contravenes Article 3 of the Protocol No one of the European Convention on Human Rights[9]. Further, the Labor government prepares two types of stage consultation procedures on behalf of the change in the policy. In June 2010, the Council of Committee of Europe uttered deep regret that there was no implementation of the ban on the right time for 2010 general election[10]. On the month of December of the same year, there was a declaration from the side of the government that it would bring legislature to permit those prisoners sentenced not less than four years, the right to cast the vote in the parliamentary of UK and the parliament elections of Europe. Until and unless the judge present on the House considered the case to be in appropriate. On the first day of March 2011, the latest ECHR was referred by the government of Europe dealing with the issue, the MT judgments and the Greens, to the Grand Chamber of Human Rights Court of the European Court. This in return made an appeal before the Courts decision that the United Kingdom must introduce the legislation for six months from the 1st of March[11]. On September 2011, the government declares that it have made an increase in the time limit to acquire details of the referral of Scoppola v Italy (No 3) to the Grand Chamber. The government, therefore, was notified that the court had permitted an increase the period of six months starting the judgment day of Scoppola[12]. Sections 4 and 10 of the Human Rights Act 1998 enable the Human Rights Act 1998 to be effective in the United Kingdom. Section 4 permits courts to grant a declaration of inco mpatibility which makes it impossible to use section 3 for interpreting primary or subordinate legislation so that their provisions are compatible with the articles of the European Convention of Human Rights, which are also part of the Human Rights Act. In these cases, interpretation to comply may conflict with legislative intent. It is considered a measure of last resort. A range of superior courts can issue a declaration of incompatibility. In Reg. v. Home Secretary, Ex p. Brind, the doctrine of "proportionality"was highlighted. The Court held that that the European Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms was not part of English domestic law. The right to vote is not applicable for the prisoners who are serving a sentence in the United Kingdom. This prohibition was protected in the Representation of People Act, 1983 in section 3, which was later amended in the year 1985[13]. On 22 November 2012 the Government published a draft Bill, the Voting Eligibility (Prisoners) Bill, for pre-legislative scrutiny by a Joint Committee of both Houses. The Committee published its report on 18 December 2013 and recommended that the Government should introduce legislation to allow all prisoners serving sentences of 12 months or less to vote in all UK Parliamentary, local and regional European elections. This law for the prisoners of banishment from voting was first included in the Forfeiture Act 1870 in the chapter of civic death'. The rights of citizenship were denied to the prisoners. However, this act was amended in the year 1969 by the Representation of the People Act, which stated that the convicted prisoners would be temporarily prohibited from voting as long as they are in the prison, which was an extension of the Criminal Law Act, 1967. There was still a case of voting by the prisoners of UK between 1948 to 1969 because of the Draft Voting Eligibility (Prisoners) Bill. In the year 1999, it was identified by the office of the Working Party on Electoral Procedures that the prisoners who are unsentenced and detained on remand should be disenfranchised from the registration and rights to vote. The Representation of the People Act 1983 stated that prisoners who are in the penal institution could not have the rights to vote, as the institution shall not be identified as a residential address for electoral registration purpose. Therefore, the prisoners cannot be registered as electors as they cannot provide any other alternative address during their stay in the institution[14]. The Working Party came up with the proposal that there is no point in depriving the unconvicted prisoners from the voting rights and stated that the unconvicted prisoners who are on remand should be considered as electors as per their original registers till they are sentenced undergo changes and therefore, the committee proposed that these remanded prisoners should be registered as other electors as against their primary address. The Working Party identified the situation that in case of a prisoner found guilty in a court case it will not be possible to establish the seriousness and nature of the offence without the sentence benefits that justifies the sentence. Therefore, no recommendation was made for this type of prisoners[15]. Representation of the People Act 2000 implemented the recommendations, which were for the remand prisoners. The condition of the disenfranchised prisoners did not change in this act as it was amended in the Representation of the People Act 1983. The later governments have put forward the fact that the moral authority for voting cannot be implemented on the prisoners who have been sentenced imprisonment because of serious crimes. This issue was discussed in 2003 in the House of Lords and was questioned to the Home Office Minister[16]. The Prison Reform Trust has been long dealing with this issue of for the rights of the prisoners to vote. Its Prisoners and the Democratic Process in December 1988 argued the fact that the rights to vote increases the social responsibility sense among the prisoners and so they insisted that all the prisoners in UK should be provided with this right to vote. They also asked the Select Committee of the Home Affairs in 1997-98 to inquire in to the Electoral Law and Administration. The Prison Reform Trust and The National Association of Ex-Offenders introduced a program named as Barred from Voting for securing the voting rights of the prisoners[17]. They raised the argument, which stated that providing with this voting right for the prisoners will enable them to take responsibilities which are a part of their citizenship. This will also make the politicians focus more on the prisons and therefore the level of penal policy and prisons will be elevated. Various noted politicians and diplomats joined the campaign like Lord Douglas Hard, Baroness Kennedy and Simon Hughes, which fortified the objectives of the group[18]. In March 2005, the debate reached great heights when the rights to vote for the prisoners were supported by Charles Kennedy, who was the then leader of the Liberal Democrats. He proposed that every citizen of UK is an individual citizen and all of them should have the basic citizenship rights, which includes the right to vote. During the election campaign in 2005, Alan Milburn criticized the views of Charles Kennedy stating that the convicted criminals should not be allowed to vote and has their choice in matters that govern the policies of Great Britain[19]. The Conservatives and David Davis, the secretary of Shadow Home, opposed the views of Charles Kennedy stating that prisoners should not have the priorities to choose the ruler of UK. Rather the victim of the crimes committed by those criminals should be favored and the right to vote for the criminals and prisoners should never be implemented for maintaining the balance of the justice system for the criminals[20]. There is no ban for the prisoners from casting their votes in the 18 European countries like Ireland, Finland, Denmark, Sweden, Switzerland and Spain. In some of the countries, the right to vote depends on the sentence duration of type of the committed crime. In some countries, they are allowed to vote only during specified elections. France has the constitutional rule wherein the political rights of the prisoners get forfeited in case of certain crimes. Germany has the rule that in case of crimes, which affect the democratic orders or state integrity, the voting rights of the prisoners are terminated[21]. The European countries, which have a ban like UK on the voting rights of the prisoners, are Estonia, Bulgaria, Hungary, Liechtenstein and Georgia. Japan and Russia have a complete ban on voting of their prisoners. Australian prisoners have the right to vote in only two of the states out of seven. The United States have a much stringent rule, which bans some of the prisoners from casting their vote even after their release[22]. Ireland had legislation passed in 2006, which allowed every prisoner in the country by post in the respective constituency of their permanent address. Cyprus also allowed a complete right to vote in the same year and came out of a previous ban on their voting. Three of the prisoners of UK in the year 2001 had raised their voice against the decision of Electoral Registration Officer regarding their electoral registration. However, their applications were dismissed in the High Court. It was declared that the voting rights of the prisoners have to be decided by the Parliament and it is not a matter to be decided by the courts. The case of John Hirst was given the judgment on 2004 on 30th March by the European Court of Human Rights. Hirst, who was sentenced for life for murder, challenged the decision of the ban on voting[23]. He lost the case in High Court in 2001 on the similar issue and refilled his application. In the said case the court ruled that a blanket ban onBritish prisonersexercising the right to vote is contrary to theEuropean Convention on Human Rights. The European Convention on Human Rights states that the elections should be free for expressing the peoples opinion in the legislation choice. Based on this fact seven judges raised the issue that the voting rights of the prisoners is being breached as per this law. In context to this, the Department of Constitutional Affairs stated that the prisoners should be banned from voting because after committing a serious crime they should not have the right to choose their government. On 2005, the European Court of Human Rights found that the protocol 1 of article 3 has been breached by the ban of rights of the prisoners to vote. However, the court stated that the convicts have the all fundamental freedom and rights as provided by the law. However, they are not allowed liberty rights. Therefore, it was clear that the prisoners have lost their rights to vote only because they have been detained. The people who have been convicted because of a serious offence and whose activity seriously damaged the democratic foundation should not be sanctioned the legislative liberties to prevent arbitrariness[24]. The court stated that the ban on voting applied to 48,000 prisoners. These included only those prisoners who were found to have committed a serious crime and did not include those convicts who have been detained on remand. 48,000 was a figure big enough to neglect and included a variety of sentences ranging from one day to life sentence and minor crimes to serious offences. However, while declaring the sentences for these criminals, nothing was mentioned or referred either regarding the ban to vote for these criminals collectively or in individual cases. No debate was raised by the legislative members regarding the standards of human rights and current penal policy for maintaining the restriction on the prisoners' rights to vote. However, restrictions if any has to be imposed will be decided by the parliament, as it is not a matter to be settled by the court[25]. The Representation of the People Act 2000 granted the permission to vote for the prisoners in remand, but no significant output was achieved out of this order as the ban continued on the prisoners towards their rights to vote. In a famous United Kingdom case law Scoppola v Italy, the European Court of Human Rights held that there was a violation of the Human Rights Protocol because a voting ban was imposed on an individual after he was criminal convicted. The individual claimed that his rights under Human Rights laws were violated and the European Court upheld the claim and stated that the said proposed ban was unjustified. In the said case, the plaintiff Franco Scoppola was sentenced with life imprisonment in 2002 for the charges of murder, attempt to murder, ill-treatment and illegal possession of firearms. Under the Italian law, the plaintiff life sentence was followed by a lifetime ban from public office, which means a lifetime ban from voting rights in Italy[26]. The first appeal from the plaintiff apposing the ban was unsuccessful however, his life prison was reduced to 30 years in 2010. Therefore, the plaintiff stated that the life imprisonment sentence passed earlier had made him ineligible to vote for the entire life. The plaintiff stated that the ban on voting rights is an additional punishment which achieves nothing in its outcome. It lacks to protect the public order and safety and is a poor deterrent to filter and stop crime. It is not a correct method to treat the offending behaviour of prisoners and lacks to provide appropriate rehabilitation of the prisoners. While deciding the said case, the Court held that there was no violation of the Article 1 and 3 of the Human Rights Protocol and Convention. The reason given by the court was that in Italy only prisoners who are sentenced to prison selected offences for a period of 3 years or more were falling under the blanket of prisoner who lost their right to vote. Therefore, only a certain offences against the State and the judicial system made a prisoner lose his voting right. As there was no general discrimination, the Court held that the said Italian law did not violate a Human Rights Convention or Protocol. In the said case, The United Kingdom government was given a leave as a third party to make submissions about the fact that each State has a wide range of discretion in determining how it should regulate ban which include determining what type of offences committed will attract lose of voting rights along with the decision on disenfranchisement. It is for the Government to decide whether d isenfranchisement should be done by formulating a law or by resolving each case as and when it comes to the Courts. In 2011, along with two, more cases from a different country were appealed to the Grand Chamber and the previous judgement was upheld. However, this explains why there is a rise in the case concerning the same matter in United Kingdom[27]. However, there was a rise in case laws concerning the said matter following the decision of the recent case law decided by the European Court of Human Rights. The judgement of Hirst relating to the voting rights of the prisoners created many complex issues concerning the matter. The buzz after the said judgement made it clear that the United Kingdom government will have to amend the Section 3 of the Representation of People Acts 1983[28]. This amendment can be either in the form of a new legislation or by issuing a remedial order to comply with the judgement passed by the European Court of Human Rights in various cases concerning voting rights of prisoners which were considered unlawful. Thus, the option for changing the law was being considered. The Labour Government proposed the following options for changing the law:- Enfranchise prisoners sentenced to less prison term The United Kingdom need to adopt a policy, which is popular among the other European nations to enfranchise prisoners sentenced to less than a specified term. This means that the prisoner is allowed to retain their voting rights if their prison sentence is less than a specified term like 3 years or 5 years and the prisoners who are given longer sentences can be enfranchised. The proposed draft gave an example of European countries which have adopted the said policy like in Belgium a prisoner who is sentenced for a period of more than 4 months are not eligible to vote and in Australia the specified period extends to one and a half years[29]. Allow Court to determine on withdrawal from voting rights One of the best methods to resolve the matter of ban of voting rights of the prisoner is to let the Court decide while sentencing a prisoner whether the prisoner is entitled to a ban on voting rights. This can be implemented in two different ways, the first being that legislation is passed which allows the Judges to decide whether even after a disenfranchisement procedure; the prisoner should retain his right to vote. The second method would provide the power on the Judge to determine the prisoner to lose his voting rights despite the availability of no general disqualifications. However, the only drawback in this method is that it increases the burden on the Courts, Judges and the Judiciary in the United Kingdom. Right to vote for all tariff-expired life sentence prisoners The prisoners who are sentenced for life-imprisonment as they presence is considered a serious threat to the public and country at large are not required to be enfranchised as the process is proving voting rights to such dangerous people will not make any sense. However, there are some prisoners who are of a certain category which is not required to enfranchise either due to the nature of their offence or due to the nature of their health under which crime was committed by them. For example, prisoner who are sentenced due to their offence relating to elections. According to the present law, prisoners who receive sentence due to their offence in relation to election automatically lose their right to vote under the current laws of the ban on prisoners voting. The United Kingdom legislation has penalties and punishment relating to election offences, which include the ban on voting. The United Kingdom government has stated earlier also does such custodial punishment also violate Human Rights. Another category of prisoners who are detained by committing offences in the mental hospital is a matter of concern in deciding the issue faced from the ban on voting rights of prisoners. Under section 3A of the Representation of the People Act 1983, any prisoner detained in the mental hospital is refrained from registering to vote in the United Kingdom. The Government questions the utility of extending voting rights to people who are considered mental or people with low or no reasoning[30]. The response of this proposal was published in the year 2009, which stated that the United Kingdom government to meet the requirements and to comply with the judgements of the European Court of Human Rights have to introduce a little enfranchisement of the sentenced prisoners in the custody. The length of the prisoner's sentence can be determining the eligibility of the prisoners by creating a threshold, however; the final call on the said legislation should rest on the decision of the parliament. The new suggested plan made recommendations, which stated that prisoners who are sentenced with a sentence of less than one year or 2 years or 4 years would automatically retain their right to vote however the same will be subject to certain exceptions which will be based on the type of offence[31]. However, prisoners who have been sentenced twice but less than four times can apply to the Court to be entitled to the right to vote however the same is possible only after valid application and permission granted by the Court. However, prisoners who are sentenced for a term of more than 4 years will not be entitled to vote under any circumstances[32]. On 6 September 2011the government announced that the European Court of Human Rights has given them a period of 6 months to adopt a proper legislation concerning the matter of voting rights of prisoners. The United Kingdom government was informed that it has received an extension of 6 months to adopt appropriate legislation six months from the date of the decision of the Scoppola case. However, the European Court of Human Rights ruled that the prisoners who are serving a sentence for serious offences like murder, rape and possessing arms illegally are permitted not to be given the right to vote without violating any ban of the Human Rights mentioned in the Human Right Convention and Protocol. The European Court of Human Rights stated that the base of distinguishing is that of serious offences." Conclusion Therefore, the United Kingdom government needs to make promptly laws, which comply with the judgement passed by the European Court of Human Rights to remedy the prisoners' rights to vote for removal of the ban on prisoner voting rights when the prisoners are sentenced for non-serious offences. However, when serious offences appear, the legislation is justified in imposing a ban on the voting rights of the prisoners who are a serious and continuous threat to the public safety and order in United Kingdom. Under the Human Rights Act, a minster ahs the power, in certain specified situation, to issue a remedial order in order to remove an incompatibility or a conflict between the national laws of a country and the Conventional rights. Therefore, the best solution in the matter of banning the prisoner voting rights is that a minister be appointed to puts an immediate rest to the pro-longed matter by making a remedial order and issuing an order to the United Kingdom government to make their domestic law according to the Human Right Convention and by abiding with the Protocol so formed[33]. Thus, the long debate will eventually end giving the United Kingdom a suitable legislation in the mater, which relates to releasing the ban from voting rights of the prisoners in the United Kingdom. Bibliography Amos, Merris. "Transplanting Human Rights Norms: The Case of the United Kingdom's Human Rights Act."Human Rights Quarterly35.2 (2013): 386-407. Bellamy, Richard. "Political Constitutionalism and the Human Rights Act."International Journal of Constitutional Law9.1 (2011): 86-111. Brady, Alan DP.Proportionality and Deference under the UK Human Rights Act: An Institutionally Sensitive Approach. Cambridge University Press, 2012. Cliquennois, Gatan, and Brice Champetier. "A new risk management for prisoners in France: The emergence of a death-avoidance approach."Theoretical Criminology17.3 (2013): 397-415. Coupland, Nikolas. "Other representation."Society and Language Use7 (2010): 241-260. Donnelly, Jack.International human rights. ReadHowYouWant. com, 2010. Fekete, Liz, and Frances Webber. "Foreign nationals, enemy penology and the criminal justice system."Race Class51.4 (2010): 1-25. Gentili, Gianluca. "European Court of Human Rights: An absolute ban on deportation of foreign citizens to countries where torture or ill-treatment is a genuine risk."International Journal of Constitutional Law8.2 (2010): 311-322. Heibert, Janet L. "Human Rights Act: Ambiguity about Parliamentary Sovereignty, The."German LJ14 (2013): 2253. Hepple, Bob. "The new single equality act in Britain."The Equal Rights Review5 (2010): 11-24. Lockard, Joe, and Sherry Rankins-Robertson. "The right to education, prisonuniversity partnerships, and online writing pedagogy in the US."Critical Survey23.3 (2011): 23-39. Mackay, Anita. "The human rights implications of smoking bans in closed environments: What Australia may learn from the international experience."International Journal of Law, Crime and Justice(2016). Malleson, Kate, and Richard Moules.The legal system. Vol. 2. Oxford University Press, 2010. Mauer, Marc. "Voting Behind Bars: An Argument for Voting by Prisoners."Howard LJ54 (2010): 549. McIntyre, James, et al. "Uptake and knowledge of voting rights by adult in-patients during the 2010 UK general election."The Psychiatrist Online36.4 (2012): 126-130. McNulty, Des, Nick Watson, and Gregory Philo. "Human Rights and Prisoners' Rights: The British Press and the Shaping of Public Debate."The Howard Journal of Criminal Justice53.4 (2014): 360-376. Murray, Colin RG. "A perfect storm: Parliament and prisoner disenfranchisement."Parliamentary Affairs(2012): gsr071. Ramsay, Peter. "Faking democracy with prisoners' voting rights." (2013). Ramsay, Peter. "Voters should not be in prison! The rights of prisoners in a democracy."Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy16.3 (2013): 421-438. Rees, Gareth, and James Reed. "Patients or prisoners? Time to reconsider the voting rights of mentally disordered offenders."BJPsych Bull(2015): pb-bp. Rehman, Javaid.International human rights law. Pearson education, 2010. Ridyard, Richard. "The governments ban on prisoners receiving books is the antithesis of the rehabilitation revolution promised by Chris Grayling."Democratic Audit Blog(2014). Skelton, Tracey. "Taking young people as political actors seriously: opening the borders of political geography."Area42.2 (2010): 145-151. Skelton, Tracey. "Taking young people as political actors seriously: opening the borders of political geography."Area42.2 (2010): 145-151. Slapper, Gary. "Ballot Box and the Jail Cell, The."J. Crim. L.75 (2011): 1. Tomuschat, Christian.Human rights: between idealism and realism. Vol. 13. Oxford University Press, USA, 2014. White, Isobel. "Prisoners voting rights." (2013). [1] Skelton, Tracey. "Taking young people as political actors seriously: opening the borders of political geography."Area42.2 (2010): 145-151. [2] Ramsay, Peter. "Faking Democracy with prisoners' voting rights." (2013). [3] Cliquennois, Gatan, and Brice Champetier. "A new risk management for prisoners in France: The emergence of a death-avoidance approach."Theoretical Criminology17.3 (2013): 397-415. [4] Stockdale v Hansard(1839) 9 Ad El 1 [5] Lake v. King(1667) [6] Gridley v. Johnson,476 S.W.2d 475(Mo.1972) [7] Smile v. Lawson,506 S.W.2d 400, 402 (1974) [8] Scoppola v. Italy [9] Lockard, Joe, and Sherry Rankins-Robertson. "The right to education, prisonuniversity partnerships, and online writing pedagogy in the US."Critical Survey23.3 (2011): 23-39. [10] Ramsay, Peter. "Faking Democracy with prisoners' voting rights." (2013). [11] Gentili, Gianluca. "European Court of Human Rights: An absolute ban on deportation of foreign citizens to countries where torture or ill-treatment is a genuine risk."International Journal of Constitutional Law8.2 (2010): 311-322. [12] McIntyre, James, et al. "Uptake and knowledge of voting rights by adult in-patients during the 2010 UK general election."The Psychiatrist Online36.4 (2012): 126-130. [13] Cliquennois, Gatan, and Brice Champetier. "A new risk management for prisoners in France: The emergence of a death-avoidance approach."Theoretical Criminology17.3 (2013): 397-415. [14] Murray, Colin RG. "A perfect storm: Parliament and prisoner disenfranchisement."Parliamentary Affairs(2012): gsr071 [15] Cliquennois, Gatan, and Brice Champetier. "A new risk management for prisoners in France: The emergence of a death-avoidance approach."Theoretical Criminology17.3 (2013): 397-415. [16] Ramsay, Peter. "Voters should not be in prison! The rights of prisoners in a democracy."Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy16.3 (2013): 421-438. [17] Ridyard, Richard. "The governments ban on prisoners receiving books is the antithesis of the rehabilitation revolution promised by Chris Grayling."Democratic Audit Blog(2014). [18] McNulty, Des, Nick Watson, and Gregory Philo. "Human Rights and Prisoners' Rights: The British Press and the Shaping of Public Debate."The Howard Journal of Criminal Justice53.4 (2014): 360-376. [19] Malleson, Kate, and Richard Moules.The legal system. Vol. 2. Oxford University Press, 2010. [20] Ridyard, Richard. "The governments ban on prisoners receiving books is the antithesis of the rehabilitation revolution promised by Chris Grayling."Democratic Audit Blog(2014). [21] Amos, Merris. "Transplanting Human Rights Norms: The Case of the United Kingdom's Human Rights Act."Human Rights Quarterly35.2 (2013): 386-407. [22] Fekete, Liz, and Frances Webber. "Foreign nationals, enemy penology and the criminal justice system."Race Class51.4 (2010): 1-25. [23] Mackay, Anita. "The human rights implications of smoking bans in closed environments: What Australia may learn from the international experience."International Journal of Law, Crime and Justice(2016). [24] Mackay, Anita. "The human rights implications of smoking bans in closed environments: What Australia may learn from the international experience."International Journal of Law, Crime and Justice(2016). [25] Rehman, Javaid.International human rights law. Pearson education, 2010. [26] Donnelly, Jack.International human rights. ReadHowYouWant. com, 2010. [27] Brady, Alan DP.Proportionality and Deference under the UK Human Rights Act: An Institutionally Sensitive Approach. Cambridge University Press, 2012. [28] Bellamy, Richard. "Political Constitutionalism and the Human Rights Act."International Journal of Constitutional Law9.1 (2011): 86-111. [29] Tomuschat, Christian.Human rights: between idealism and realism. Vol. 13. Oxford University Press, USA, 2014. [30] Coupland, Nikolas. "Other representation."Society and Language Use7 (2010): 241-260 [31] Skelton, Tracey. "Taking young people as political actors seriously: opening the borders of political geography."Area42.2 (2010): 145-151. [32] Hepple, Bob. "The new single equality act in Britain."The Equal Rights Review5 (2010): 11-24. [33] Skelton, Tracey. "Taking young people as political actors seriously: opening the borders of political geography."Area42.2 (2010): 145-151.

Friday, April 10, 2020

Gossip free essay sample

A discussion of the social role of gossip, its damages and how to stop it. This paper presents a discussion on gossip, particularly why gossiping is so popular and how it affects people and society. Additionally, this paper addresses various ways to prevent gossip. The paper is based on the book by Rabbi Stephen Wylens The Power of the Word and other scholars wishing to decrease the amount of gossip spoken. The paper looks at gossip as a social need yet also shows its damaging effects on society. Dirt, mudslinging, hearsay and tittle-tattle are words synonymous with gossip. Encarta defines gossip as conversation about personal or intimate rumors or facts, especially when malicious; informal and chatty conversation or writing about recent and often personal events. Rumors are closely related to gossip in that rumors are usually gossip that is spread and repeated about a persons intimate details. According Robin Dunbar author of Grooming, Gossip and the Evolution of Language, gossip is a natural part of the human species, as apes and monkeys, humanities closets kin used language to keep up to date on the happenings of friends and family, just as we do. We will write a custom essay sample on Gossip or any similar topic specifically for you Do Not WasteYour Time HIRE WRITER Only 13.90 / page Dunbar believes that we need conversation to stay in touch, and we need it in ways that will not be satisfied by teleconferencing, e-mail, or any other communication technology. From a religious perspective Rabbi Stephen Wylen suggests in his book The Power of the Word that idle gossip and malicious speech are the most frequent and pervasive sins of ordinary life he believes people either consciously or unconsciously persist in patterns of speech that disrupt relationships, create unhappiness, and even endanger lives. However one chooses to rationalize gossip it has become so embedded into American culture that oftentimes we cannot decipher mere gossip from news.

Monday, March 9, 2020

Comparison of Nora from A Dolls House by Henrik Ibsen and Elisa from The Chrysanthemums by John Steinbeck

Comparison of Nora from A Dolls House by Henrik Ibsen and Elisa from The Chrysanthemums by John Steinbeck Two female characters Nora from A Doll’s House by Henrik Ibsen and Elisa from The Chrysanthemums by John Steinbeck have many similar characteristics. Both are women who live with husbands who do not understand them and do not feel the things as women do.Advertising We will write a custom research paper sample on Comparison of Nora from A Doll’s House by Henrik Ibsen and Elisa from The Chrysanthemums by John Steinbeck specifically for you for only $16.05 $11/page Learn More Both characters are intelligent women who need to change their life, but being brutalized by husbands, they do not know how to improve the life. However, there is also a number of differences in the characters’ behavior. One woman stays in the same place with the same conditions and another does away towards the new happy life. The story of John Steinbeck describes only one day of life of the character, while Henrik Ibsen uses three acts in order to provide the whole p icture and to describe the rise of the conflict in details and its future culmination. One can notice that these two stories and their major female characters are similar, as they both face the similar circumstances; however, on the other hand, Nora and Elisa demonstrate different reactions on the circumstances that married life provides. The play A Doll’s House describes the nature of the relationship between husband and wife. Ibsen as the founder of realist drama uses the ideas, events and characters which are typical in the usual life. According to Goldman, the main ideas of this play are â€Å"the Social Lie and Duty† (1914). Ibsen provides the description of the social duty of woman in a home as the sacred institution. In the world ruled by men the place of women is at home. Some of people willingly accept this way; however, for other people such way of life can be a complicated challenge. The female character, Nora, seems deeper and more intelligent than her husb and Torvald. The woman has many ideas, dreams and hopes; she wants to have better life and feels that all this routine of married life with Torvald kills her personality. She sees that her husband is not that person that she imagined. He is narcissistic and does not care about Nora, children or home. Nora’s enthusiasm does not allow her to be a simple house wife, a doll of her husband. Obviously, there are many women who can accept such way of life; however, Nora is not one of them. She is not a doll and she cannot live with someone who considers her as a doll, as a toy. Nora’s life seems complicated and painful. However, she struggles for her happiness. On the other hand, many people can say that in this situation Torvald is the real victim.Advertising Looking for research paper on comparative literature? Let's see if we can help you! Get your first paper with 15% OFF Learn More It may be complicated to comprehend how woman could leave her chil dren; however, for Nora, such method seems only one and right solution. She wants to survive in this world and to start the life from the new page. Ibsen does not provide the ideas about Nora’s future and what she is going to do, where to go and how to life. Nevertheless, the author emphasizes an importance of the personal choice in spite of life of a doll. A short story The Chrysanthemums describes a life of a strong and proud Elisa Allen. Although this woman has the outstanding principles, intellect, she is kind and well-behavior, her life is full of frustration and even sorrow. She cannot have a child and her husband loses his interest toward Elisa as a woman. Only one good thing she has is her garden where the woman can cultivate the chrysanthemums. In this context, the flower is a symbol of every woman who feels frustrated and lonely. Devoting all the energy to the house and garden, Elisa is unable to find more interesting business that could draw her attention, to bring more color to her life. Although the flowers are beautiful and make the life brighter, they are not humans; they cannot provide the same feeling, emotions or help to develop the life. Elisa is ignored and lost in her own home. The evident mood of this story is the total melancholy. The first sentence is a bright demonstration of this statement: â€Å"The high gray-flannel fog of winter closed off the Salinas Valley from the sky and from all the rest of the world† (Steinbeck). The city of the heroes is closed from all the world as well as Elisa is closed in her house. It is the story of the desperate house wife where a happy-end seems like an incredible miracle. One can see the similarities between the image of Elisa and Nora, because both women are intelligent, passionate and unsatisfied by the life that they have to maintain. Both of the characters care about their home. Thus, Elisa’s home is â€Å"hard-swept and hard-polished† (Steinbeck), while Nora’s   Ã¢â‚¬Å"room furnished comfortably and tastefully, but not extravagantly† (Ibsen). Both of the stories take place in winter. In this context, the season can be considered as a symbolical expression of mood o the characters. However, if Elisa’s winter may last for a long time, Nora tries to reach the spring of her existence. Perhaps, the life of Nora seems more interesting, because she has children, friends and one man is even in love with her. At the same time, Elisa seems absolutely lonely and her only friends are flowers. She gets an opportunity express herself only in the conversation with the tinker. However, when this man disappears, Elisa feels even worse than before. Sweet indicates that after the meet with tinker, Elisa â€Å"becomes more and more feminine† (212). At the beginning, Nora and Torvald seem normal and happy family.Advertising We will write a custom research paper sample on Comparison of Nora from A Doll’s House by Henrik Ibs en and Elisa from The Chrysanthemums by John Steinbeck specifically for you for only $16.05 $11/page Learn More The author describes their every-days life in details. On the other hand, the beginning of The Chrysanthemums seems already melancholic and cold. It is possible to suppose that Elisa’s married life is full of problems. However, such fast way of determining the problem is caused by the characteristics of a genre of the short story, in spite of play, where the author has the space and time to describe the conflict slowly, preparing the readers for the culmination. Nora and Elisa demonstrate different reaction on the crisis. While Elisa collapses and gives up, Nora leaves her family and believes in the better future and changes in her own life. Nora does not want to help her husband. She understands that if he did not want to change something in their life before, he will never do it. Therefore, being a clever and intelligent woman, she finds the solu tion and abandons her family before she will lose herself and lose her dreams. Such culmination seems unusual for 19th century. Analysis of the cultural background demonstrates that women’s role in the West was simple and all house wives were mostly dependent on their family and especially on their husbands (Mayer 8). On the other hand, Elisa cannot find enough straights to make an important step. She loses her ability to reflect rationally. The ends of two stories are absolutely different. Elisa does not want to argue with her husband and turns up her collar, crying like an old woman. One day of Elisa’s life can be compared with all her life. The reader can suppose that every day of Elisa is the same as the one described in the story. At the end of A Dolls’ House, Nora turns back on the family and goes away, choosing her own road in this world and making a step forward the new life. Analyzing the stories A Doll’s House by Henrik Ibsen and Elisa from The Chrysanthemums by John Steinbeck, one can see the different reactions and responses to the problems and various challenges that married life provides. Although the major characters of two stories have the similar circumstances, the culminations of their problems are different. One woman decides to leave her husband and children, while another continues suffering. It is obvious that both authors sympathize their female characters; however, they choose different solutions for them. It is natural that people react in the different way as we all have different characteristics, emotional range, experience and communicational skills. Some people prefer to fight and to improve their life. They know when to stop and make a step. Nora is an example of such personality. Vice versa, Elisa shows an example of an opposite personality, a woman who cannot decide how to solve the problems and to develop her life.Advertising Looking for research paper on comparative literature? Let's see if we can help you! Get your first paper with 15% OFF Learn More Goldman, Emma. The Social Significance of the Modern Drama. Boston: Richard g. Barger, 1914. Web. lib.berkeley.edu/goldman/. Ibsen, Henrik. A Doll’s House. Gutenberg.org. Web.. Mayer, Laura Reis. Henrik Ibsen: A Doll’s House: A Teacher’s Guide to the Signet Classics Edition. US: Penguin Books, 2008. Print. Steinbeck, John. The Chrysanthemums. Web.. Sweet, Charles A. Jr. â€Å"Mr. Elisa Allen and Steinbeck’s â€Å"The Chrysanthemums.† Modern Fiction Studies. Ed. William T. Stafford and Margaret Church. Vol. 20. West Lafayette: Purdue University, 1974. 210-214. Print.

Saturday, February 22, 2020

Your an army commander. what three areas would would determin if Essay

Your an army commander. what three areas would would determin if soldiers are worthy of reinlistment. of those three areas what would the standard be for all three - Essay Example These include the following: Soldiers must meet the army standard of physical fitness, which is a minimum of 180 and a maximum of 300. Being in the army requires one to be capable of handling the physical rigors that accompany that lone of work (Hamilton 31). I would place great emphasis on physical fitness because for one to â€Å"survive† in the army it is highly recommended that they possess the capability to keep up with conditions and remain agile and mobile throughout. If someone is not fit he/she should not be in the army. There is no definite standard when it comes to career advancement, provided one is willing and ready to learn new things. For me however, I would not consider anybody without a diploma for a position in the army. Nowadays, being a soldier is not enough. Soldiers are usually encouraged to start and build other careers through which they can grow personally and professionally. This is why in most armies there are soldiers who also serve as doctors, nurses, engineers and professional and important roles. It is not enough for one to be able to load a gun and shoot, or fight and kill. Intelligence must be demonstrated, and an ability to think logically and make decisions may save a lot of lives (Hamilton 35). If anybody wants to join the army he/she should be clear thinking and reasonable. As a commander, I would feel honored to have soldiers who are both intelligent and disciplined serving under me. As a result of this, I would not think twice about enlisting a young person who has a ye arning for knowledge and combat. This, too, has no definite standard, but potential recruits must demonstrate confidence in whatever they do. For example, it is important to remain calm, level-headed and reasonable when confronted with difficult situations. This calls for coming up with the best and most logical decisions when they